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Viet Nam & UN
 
Viet Nam signed the 1984 United Nations Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment
11-07-2013, 11:40 pm

PRESS RELEASE

 

New York, 7 November 2013 - The Socialist Republic of Viet Nam became the latest signatory to the 1984 United Nations Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (UNCAT). At a ceremony held today at the United Nations Headquarters, Ambassador Le Hoai Trung, Permanent Representative of Viet Nam to the United Nations signed the treaty on behalf of the Government of Viet Nam, making the country the 81st signatory to the UNCAT. Speaking after the signing, Ambassador Le Hoai Trung underlined that by becoming a signatory to the UNCAT, Viet Nam once again reaffirms in unwavering commitment to prevent all acts of torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment of persons and to better protect and promote fundamental human rights. Signing the Convention is also a concrete step in Viet Nam’s proactive and rigorous international integration process and underlines Viet Nam’s willingness to be an active and responsible member of the international community. Ambassador Trung also believed this will also be an opportunity for Viet Nam to further improve its legal system to better protect and promote human rights in Viet Nam.

The Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on 10 December 1984. The Convention entered into force on 26 June 1987 after it had been ratified by 20 States, and as of November 2013 has 80 signatories and 154 parties. The Convention requires state parties to take effective measures to prevent torture within their borders, and forbids states to transfer people to any country where there is reason to believe they will be tortured. For more information on the UNCAT, visit the United Nations Treaty Collection at www.treaties.un.org

 



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